Tel: 01202 443064

11 Shelley Road, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH1 4JQ

Patient

Osteoporosis Dorset is a registered charity established in 1992 to raise awareness and increase public interest in bone health, falls and fragility fractures through our educational initiatives.

Osteoporosis is a silent thief; it is a disease without symptoms. It causes bones to break easily, in particular the wrist, hip and spine. Osteoporosis can affect people of any age, but it is usually a disease of older age; although younger people can sometimes be affected.

1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will suffer a fragility fracture in their remaining lifetime.

Explore the links on the right to access more information on the fragile bone disease.

Our new Good Bone Health Guide brochure, gives you basic information about osteoporosis, whilst also having a wide range of patient stories. Click here to launch our Good Bone Health Guide Brochure.

If you have a question that has not been answered by any of the information in this section, or you would like us to send you free information leaflets, you can get in touch with the charity on 01202 443064.

Patient Stories:

I broke my wrist in my fifties, but I didn’t realise there might be a connection with osteoporosis, until some years later releasing the handbrake in my car, some of the bones in my spine broke. The knowledge I’ve gained can now protect my families bone health.
Sylvia, 77
Staying fit and healthy is important to me, as I live a busy life. A DXA bone scan showed I have osteoporosis. Information from the charity is helping me manage my bone health effectively.
Linda, 50
Attending one of the Charity’s educational events provided me with the latest information. An opportunity to ask questions of local healthcare professionals. It helps me to manage my bone health.
Geraldine, 67
I have spinal fractures due to osteoporosis. A useful tip from the dietician at the charity’s support group was to use linseeds to help cope with the constipating side effects of strong pain killers. A fun way is to make flapjacks.
Nick, 43

More Patient Stories